keris-handle-hanoman

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF HANOMAN | IDR 4.000.000
Material : Moose Horn | Length 12 cm

handle for keris

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF HANOMAN | IDR 4.000.000
Material : Moose Horn  | Length 12 cm

keris-handle-dragon

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF DRAGON | IDR 1.500.000
Material : Deer Antler  | Length 12 cm

keris-handle-hanoman-deer-antlier

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF HANOMAN | IDR 2.000.000
Material : Deer Antler | Length 12 cm

keris-handle-mermaid

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF  MERMAID | IDR 1.200.000
Material : Deer Antlier | Length 12 cm

keris-handle-sangut-wood

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF SANGUT | IDR 2.000.000
Material : Wood | Length 12 cm

keris-handle-dragons

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF DRAGON | IDR 1.200.000
Material : Deer Antlier | Length 12 cm

Bone-Sangut

KERIS HANDLE MOTIF SANGUT | IDR 2.000.000
Material : Deer Antler | Length 12 cm

keris001KERIS HANDLE MOTIF PUNAKAWAN | IDR 1.500.000
Material : black wood without brass | Length 12 cm

keris002KERIS HANDLE MOTIF GANESHA | IDR 1.500.000
Material : black wood without  brass | Length 12 cm

keris003KERIS HANDLE MOTIF PUNAKAWAN | IDR 1.500.000
Material : black wood without  brass | Length 12 cm

keris004KERIS HANDLE MOTIF DRAGON BALI | IDR 1.500.000
Material : black wood without  brass | Length 12 cm

WHAT IS KERIS

The KERIS /kris (ngoko Javanese: krama inggil Javanese: ngoko: keris; krama; dhuwung; krama inggil: wangkingan, lit. “to slice”; Jawi: کريس, Thai: กริช krit, Minangkabau: karih, Tagalog: kalis; Bugis and Makassarese: sele) is an asymmetrical dagger with distinctive blade-patterning achieved through alternating laminations of iron and nickelous iron (pamor). While most strongly associated with the culture of Indonesia the kris is also indigenous to Malaysia, Thailand, Brunei, Singapore and the Philippines where it is known as kalis with variants existing as a sword rather than a dagger. The kris is famous for its distinctive wavy blade, although many have straight blades as well.

Kris have been produced in many regions of Indonesia for centuries, but nowhere—although the island of Bali comes close—is the kris so embedded in a mutually-connected whole of ritual prescriptions and acts, ceremonies, mythical backgrounds and epic poetry as in Central Java. As a result, in Indonesia the kris is commonly associated with Javanese culture, although other ethnicities are familiar with the weapon as part of their culture, such as the Balinese, Malays, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar, Thais, Bugis, Makassar, and Filipinos.

A kris can be divided into three parts: blade (bilah or wilah), hilt (hulu), and sheath (warangka). These parts of the kris are objects of art, often carved in meticulous detail and made from various materials: metal, precious or rare types of wood, or gold or ivory. A kris’s aesthetic value covers the dhapur (the form and design of the blade, with around 60 variants), the pamor (the pattern of metal alloy decoration on the blade, with around 250 variants), and tangguh referring to the age and origin of a kris. Depending on the quality and historical value of the kris, it can fetch thousands of dollars or more.

Both a weapon and spiritual object, kris are often considered to have an essence or presence, considered to possess magical powers, with some blades possessing good luck and others possessing bad. Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, a sanctified heirloom (pusaka), auxiliary equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, a symbol of heroism, etc. Legendary kris that possess supernatural power and extraordinary ability were mentioned in traditional folktales, such as those of Empu Gandring, Taming Sari, and Setan Kober.

In 2005, UNESCO gave the title Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity to the kris of Indonesia. In return, UNESCO urged Indonesia to preserve their heritage.

COLLECTIVE TROPEN MUSEUM Kris met schede TMnr A-1448.jpgThe kris consists of three parts; blade (wilah), hilt (hulu) and sheath (warangka)TypeDaggerPlace of originJava, IndonesiaService historyIn serviceSinghasari Kingdom, Majapahit Empire, Ayutthaya Kingdom, Malaccan Empire, Demak Sultanate, Mataram Sultanate, Yogyakarta Sultanate, Surakarta Sunanate, Bruneian Empire, Sultanate of Sulu, Sultanate of Maguindanao, present day IndonesiaUsed by Javanese (mainly & originally)
* Also familiar to Malays, Filipinos, Sundanese, Banjar, Madurese, Balinese, Moro, Siamese, Bugis, Makassar Wars Pamalayu expedition, Mongol invasion of Java, Battle of Bubat, Majapahit civil war, Burmese-Siamese wars, Siege of Batavia, Diponegoro War, Indonesian National Revolution, Spanish–Moro conflict, Philippine–American War, Pacific War. Production history Produced disputed (?) to present Variants Kalis Specifications Blade type Double edged nickelous iron or steel Hilt type Ivory, bone, horn, wooden or metals. Sometimes coated with gold or silver and decorated with gemstones Scabbard/sheath Wooden frame covered and decorated with ivory or metals (gold, silver, copper, iron, brass, or steel)This article contains letters from the Javanese script. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Javanese characters. [source : wikipedia]